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Cohen Law > Blog (Page 17)

Chinese Trademarks Are More Important Than You Think

As a Los Angeles patent and trademark attorney, many of my clients ask about the possibility of getting their invention stolen when manufacturering in China. Sorry to scare you, but now you have something else to worry about. Recently, companies manufacturing in China have come across some costly and time-consuming trademark predicaments. It seems that certain players in the Chinese market are using the Chinese trademark system to swindle unsuspecting American companies. These hucksters sell trademarks back to companies, manipulating the Chinese legal and trademark system. It works something like this: An American company decides to manufacture their product in China,...

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Aerosmith Trademark Battle Near

A trademark battle for the ownership of the Aerosmith name could be on the horizon. For nearly a year now, rumors have been circulating about Steven Tyler splitting from Aerosmith. Now, it appears that he might be kicked out. However, Skip Miller, Tyler’s attorney, is threatening to sue the remaining members of the band for trademark infringement if Tyler gets the boot. According to the USPTO, Aerosmith is a registered trademark of Rag Doll Merchandising, Inc. According to Joe Perry, guitarist for Aerosmith, a combination Tyler’s lack of communication, injuries, and addiction to painkillers have plagued the band for some time...

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Jersey Shore Trademark for “The Situation” May Turn Into a Priority Dispute

“The Situation,” a phrase made popular by the MTV reality show “Jersey Shore,” is under review for a trademark. “The Situation” is a nickname that Michael Sorrentino, the show’s ripped leading man, has given to his abdominal muscles. Contrary to rumors going around that he is attempting to trademark his abs, we have not found any such trademark application with USPTO. Rather, there are two pending applications for the mark, both in Class 25 for clothing and related accessories. However, the story gets a little more interesting. The two applications are owned by different companies. One by Vadio Limited Liability Corporation...

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Apple’s Ipad Runs Into Fujitsu’s Trademark Application

With all the buzz last week over Apple’s new iPad, a significant detail may have been overlooked. Apparently, Fujitsu has been manufacturing and selling their own Fujitsu “iPad” for more than 8 years. The Fujitsu device isn’t an Apple knockoff, but rather a different kind of pad, a Windows point-of-sale tool for retailers. But it’s also called the iPad, and Fujitsu actually applied for a trademark in 2003. Initially Fujitsu’s application was abandoned in view of an existing application for “ipad” from a company called Mag-Tek! The original iPad, it seems, was a kind of pin-entry pad made by a...

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Trademark Dispute USC vs. USC

The University of Southern California recently emerged victorious in an off-the-field battle with the University of South Carolina. The trademark dispute was over the use of the interlocking “SC” logo, used by both schools. A federal appeals court ruled that Southern California still has the legal ownership of the trademark logo. The two schools have locked horns over the logo since 2002, when South Carolina attempted to federally register their logo. Southern California already had a registered trademark on the interlocking letters, and asserted that the logos were too similar. The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (TTAB) agreed, and South...

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University Trademarks Versus Small Business Trademark: Dakota Micro’s AgCam

Dakota Micro, Inc. is a Geneseo, North Dakota manufacturer of a product called the “AgCam,” a camera that allows farmers to easily monitor farm equipment. By coincidence, students at the University of North Dakota (UND) built a camera to monitor rangeland and crops from space, and also called it the AgCam. As it turns out, UND’s camera didn’t work after it was fired into space with the shuttle Endeavor. Farmers began to doubt the quality of Dakota Micro’s cameras, thinking UND’s “Agcam” was also made by Dakota Micro. When Dakota Micro confronted UND, and asked them to change the name of...

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Trademarks for 2010: Clear your Trademark with a Trademark Search First

Why is it so important for you to have your trademark attorney apply for a trademark application? There are many reasons, but before I answer that question, it is even more important to conduct a trademark search first, prior to the adoption of the name you wish to use for your brand or business. Why? Imagine you did not have your trademark lawyer conduct a search, and you just decided to use a name for your new product. Let’s say you have commenced manufacturing the product and packaging for it, so the name you picked is all over the packaging and...

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Los Angeles Trademark Lawyers for Sublime File Ex Parte Temporary Restraining Order

Looks like the long-awaited comeback of the remaining Sublime band members isn’t going to go as expected. In a preliminary injunction early this month, on November 3, 2009, Judge A. Howard Matz of the US District Court of the Central District of California granted an injunction against surviving band members, Bud Gaugh and Eric Wilson, to play publically with a new singer under the well-recognized name, “Sublime.” The Plaintiff is the estate of Bradley Nowell, the band’s now deceased lead-singer, objected to the use of “Sublime,” arguing that Wilson and Gaugh aren’t the rightful owners of the name. Judge Matz...

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LOS ANGELES COPYRIGHT ATTORNEY FILED LAWSUIT AGAINST CHRIS ROCK

A complaint and later filed Ex Parte Application for Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) was filed against Chris Rock and HBO to prevent the release of Rock’s film, Good Hair, in the Central District of Los Angeles. Plaintiff Regina Kimbell, has already written and produced a documentary entitled My Nappy Roots, which explores the social and cultural issues surround black hair care. Kimbell claims that Rock invited her to the Paramount lot and asked her to bring a copy of her film with the intention helping her with it. But rather, Rock was really looking for research and help himself with his...

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Annie Leibovitz Is Having Copyright Issues

Celebrity photographer Annie Leibovitz nearly lost the copyrights to her famous photography as a result of her default on a $24 million loan. Art Capital Group (“ACG”), the lender, sued Leibovitz back in July due to breach of contract of their agreement. As collateral, Leibovitz used her real estate assets and the copyright to every photograph she has ever taken. ACG estimated that the value of her intellectual property is approximately at $40 million in addition to $40 million in her real estate. Luckily for her, she was granted an extension to repay the $24 million and ACG seems to be in...

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