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Cohen Law > Blog (Page 18)

Los Angeles Trademark Lawyers for Sublime File Ex Parte Temporary Restraining Order

Looks like the long-awaited comeback of the remaining Sublime band members isn’t going to go as expected. In a preliminary injunction early this month, on November 3, 2009, Judge A. Howard Matz of the US District Court of the Central District of California granted an injunction against surviving band members, Bud Gaugh and Eric Wilson, to play publically with a new singer under the well-recognized name, “Sublime.” The Plaintiff is the estate of Bradley Nowell, the band’s now deceased lead-singer, objected to the use of “Sublime,” arguing that Wilson and Gaugh aren’t the rightful owners of the name. Judge Matz...

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LOS ANGELES COPYRIGHT ATTORNEY FILED LAWSUIT AGAINST CHRIS ROCK

A complaint and later filed Ex Parte Application for Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) was filed against Chris Rock and HBO to prevent the release of Rock’s film, Good Hair, in the Central District of Los Angeles. Plaintiff Regina Kimbell, has already written and produced a documentary entitled My Nappy Roots, which explores the social and cultural issues surround black hair care. Kimbell claims that Rock invited her to the Paramount lot and asked her to bring a copy of her film with the intention helping her with it. But rather, Rock was really looking for research and help himself with his...

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Annie Leibovitz Is Having Copyright Issues

Celebrity photographer Annie Leibovitz nearly lost the copyrights to her famous photography as a result of her default on a $24 million loan. Art Capital Group (“ACG”), the lender, sued Leibovitz back in July due to breach of contract of their agreement. As collateral, Leibovitz used her real estate assets and the copyright to every photograph she has ever taken. ACG estimated that the value of her intellectual property is approximately at $40 million in addition to $40 million in her real estate. Luckily for her, she was granted an extension to repay the $24 million and ACG seems to be in...

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OPRAH TRADEMARK POWER

We have all heard the power of an Oprah Winfrey product endorsement, or the financial windfall that occurs when Oprah puts you on her booklist. So of course having Ms. Winfrey endorse or even review your product, book, or service is a coveted position by any entrepreneur. Oprah is fully aware of the power of her endorsements, so she is making sure that who she endorses must be accurate, protected, and not diluted by fakes claiming that their products were endorsed by her when they were in fact not. So Oprah is getting tough and has filed a federal complaint against...

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Pitching Your Invention to Toy Companies

Patenting toys is a hot area for many inventors, and can be very lucrative as well. You should always have a patent issued prior to pitching it to the toy reps otherwise you have no protection. In the very least you should have a pending patent application filed. In some rare cases, a toy company, typically smaller toy companies, will sign your non-disclosure agreement (NDA), but don’t count on it. When it comes to pitching and selling, and who to go to, it just really depends what industry you are in and if you have a winner of a product. I...

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Now is the Time to Invent and Patent

Companies have started to change their attitudes about accepting outside idea submissions from lone inventors. In the past, many companies instituted policies rejecting any outside idea submissions and instead relied on their internal R&D departments to come up with new products. Many of these companies did so to avoid potential patent infringement or other IP claims. However, with the change in the economy, many companies are cutting back in their R&D budgets, so they are realizing that accepting outside ideas to buy or license is more cost effective. A prime example is Procter & Gamble, where Greg Swartz of Arizona, a...

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Michael Jackson the Inventor had a Patent.

Who knew? Michael Jackson held a registered patent for anti-gravity footwear. Do you remember his incredible dance moves from the “Smooth Criminal” video when he would lean forward at extreme angles without falling? Turns out his magic moves were assisted by his anti-gravity shoes as patented in United States Patent Reg. No. 5,255,452 for a “Method and Means for Creating Anti-Gravity Illusion.” Method and means for creating anti-gravity illusion Michael J. Jackson et al: “” In the actual video of Smooth Criminal, his dancers had to be restrained with harnesses in order to achieve the nearly 45-degree angle lean. But for live...

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Candy.com Domain Name Sells for $3,000,000!

Is this about the power of candy or the power of domain name real estate? It was reported that Candy.com was sold by the Florida based G&J Holdings for $3,000,000 to Melville Candy Company of Massachusetts. This is the same company runned by Rick Schwartz who sold iReport.com to CNN for $750,000. After the sale of toys.com sold earlier this year for $5,100,000, the candy.com sale is the second largest domain name purchase for 2009. Hopefully Schwartz had his domain name attorney draft a solid domain name sale agreement so that there are no disputes regarding the transaction. Los Angeles Trademark Lawyer...

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